What to Make of King David’s Life

king-david

Image credit: breakingisraelnews.com

David killed a giant, soothed the soul of a king, became a king, won wars, slept with another man’s wife and got him killed to marry her, had multiple wives and concubines, some of his kids raped and killed themselves, and eventually he died. So what is there to make of King David’s life?

As I continue to push my way through the Old Testament I recently reached the end of David’s life in 1 Kings 2. There were a lot of interesting things about David’s life. Three things in particular stood out to me.

David was dedicated to honoring God

He made some mistakes, which I’ll get to later, but overall he was very dedicated to honoring God. To my recollection without looking back at the text, Saul searched to kill David two times. And two times David had a chance to kill Saul to save himself but he didn’t because he respected Saul had been the Lord’s anointed. And he left judgement and any avenging of Saul for trying to kill him despite the fact David never sinned against him to God. Quite courageous to honor God even to the point of potentially being killed for it.

David was a true friend

There was an episode that stuck out to me with regards to Mephibosheth. He was the son of Jonathan who was born lame in the feet. Because Jonathan had dealt kindly with him in his life warning him about Saul, David made sure Jonathan’s son was taken care of. He restored all of the land of his grandfather Saul and even allowed him the honor of eating at the King’s table.

David was flawed

As alluded in the beginning of this post, David was a flawed person. He slept with another man’s life, got her pregnant, and then got her husband killed. He ordered an unauthorized census of Israel which brought about a plague to the land killing thousands. It’s a funny thing how much people focus on the story of him killing Goliath and make him one of the shiniest characters in the Bible when that’s a bit off from the full truth. Nonetheless, he did get punished by God, and he did attempt to atone for his sins.

Sidenote: David had some bad kids

Some of them were bad. It’s crazy the drama that occurred in David’s family. Had one kid that raped his sister, another kid that murdered his brother, and two kids that tried to screw him over by taking his throne. Not sure why all that happened, but an interesting story nonetheless.

Conclusion

So what do we take from the life of David? Perhaps that he shows the best of what we can be. But he also showed us the worst of what we can be too. Maybe his journey shows us that life is messy, even if you’re the king of the chosen people of God. What do you think David’s life tells us?

Peace to all those are in Christ.

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6 thoughts on “What to Make of King David’s Life

  1. There are two things which always stood out to me about David. One and regarding his marriage to Bathsheba, he did not even realize he had sinned until Nathan told him. He asked, “Who is that man?” Nathan told him, “You are that man!” That is when he realized he had sinned against the Lord.

    Another was no matter what sin he committed, from murder, to adultery, to anything else, as soon as he realized he had done so, he never took another step without going to God and repenting. He stopped immediately and made it right with God.

    I think these two lessons teach us more than anything. We have sins which we are not even aware of, and no matter how vile our sins are, God never turns us away when we are ready to reconcile ourselves back to him. Another great post and God Bless, SR

    • Hi SR. Thanks for your comment. Ah yes, that is an interesting thing to note. As you alluded at the end of your comment, it makes you wonder how often we’re all unaware of our own sins and maybe whether we need someone to point out our sin to us sometimes. And also could we be able to respond to that with the same humility that David did in repenting and attempting to make up for his sins. But indeed, if we are willing to turn to God for forgiveness and move forward in trying to do things right, He’ll welcome us back. Thanks again for your comment and your compliment as well.

      Peace in Christ.

  2. It’s about as fully human a life as one can get, without being born in grace… All the extremes are there.

    I’m reading 2 Kings now, and of course, David’s faithfulness is the standard by which all the other kings are measured (with the other pole being Jeroboam).

    • Hi Christian Renaissance Movement. Thanks for your comment. Indeed, the highest of highs and lowest of lows in the life of David.

      I look forward to catching up where you are and gleaning any wisdom in the circumstances of the kings that came after David.

      Peace in Christ.

  3. David’s life is fascinating. He loved the Lord, his Psalms speak of how much. You kinda asked the question, “Why did all that bad stuff happen to David?” If you go back to the whole David and Bathsheba affair, when all that played out in the end, God told him that because of it, “the sword will never leave your house.” That’s why it all happened like that. The best thing about David is not all the good things that he did and the beautiful Psalms that he wrote, but it’s what God says about him. I don’t remember book, chapter or verse, but God said that David was “a man after My Own heart”. Ask the stuff that David did or didn’t do did not define Him. It was what God said about him that defined him.
    Think about it.
    KEEP THE LIGHT ON!

    • Hi royalpalmtree. Thanks for your comment. Ah yes, that line sounds familiar. And I’ll have to find the verse of that other line. I suppose what God says about all of us is what defines us in a larger sense.

      Peace in Christ.

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